Sarah Charsley April 2021

Bread and the Reasons to cut it From your Diet 

 cut out bread from your diet for weight loss

                                                    Does Bread make me put weight on? 

Oh bread, the love hate relationship so many of us have with it. On low-carb, the most searched for recipe is making Keto bread or low-carb bread. And we get it. But for those not following a low-carb diet let’s have a look at bread and its role in today's world.              

For the Love of bread

Bread is so handy and convenient, you can stick just about anything in between two slices – cheese, meat, fish, crisps even – and you have something that will fill you up. But unfortunately, even the bread that looks like it's been made by the pixies on Old McDonald’s organic farm is still going to make you put on weight. 

The History of Bread

We are based in the south of England where windmills adorn the countryside, reminiscent of days gone by when flour was milled straight from the grain and whisked down to the local bakeries to make the day's bread.

The reason it was whisked away so quickly was because flour didn’t last long after it was milled, about three days. This is because of the oils present in the grain. Roman legions used to have grain stores dotted up and down the roads.

Legionnaires would be given grain which they would mill themselves and make a kind of bread with beer. They often used spelt, though even that kind of spelt is very hard to get these days. 

Flour Today

Today fields of perfect corn fill our countryside and the windmills have long been put out of action for a far less romantic way of doing things.

 Flour is processed and the oils are taken out to create longevity. (We’ll give you one guess as to whether things are done for profit or for your health.)

Millions of tonnes of flour get shipped every day to large bakeries which bake bread ready for the supermarket shelves. Again, the longevity of the loaves is paramount, to the detriment your health.

Windmills create a romntic vision of bread. Today's bread is made very differently..

Windmills create a romantic vision of bread

Hence Bread Makes You Put On Weight

Like so many processed things these days modern day bread will make you put on weight. Many of us get allergic reactions to wheat in bread (rather the flour) in the form of bloating, acid reflux and even aching joints. Your body holds water to hold carbs, and these are not complex carbs. 

Many processed foods contain sugar which makes you put on weight.
lots of people get allergic reactions to wheat in bread.
Bread leads to bloating and other gut and health issues

Bread gives many of us all sorts of issues. 

But cutting our bread is hard 

Yes it is, especially if you live a life that's on the go, grabbing a sandwich for lunch, toast for breakfast. There’s no denying it’s a handy food product that has made our lives easier. But at what cost? 

Today’s bread has a similar effect to sugar 

Like so many people today sugar is playing less and less of a role in our lives (apart from the vast amount that gets snuck into food) But bread is still a big culprit when it comes to helping you put on weight and it’s not the calories that are to blame. 

Bread is high on the glycemic index 

Wholemeal bread is as high as 75 on the glycemic index. Guess what sugar is...65.
Bread can elevate your blood glucose levels more than sugar.

Even organic bread made by the pixies is around 55 (that's wholegrain using the best possible flour). This means your body produces insulin, and it's insulin that causes you to put weight on. 

But bread gives me fibre?

Yes it does, but not as much as many other foods. A slice of bread has around 1.2g of fibre. Your daily recommended is at least 25g, ideally 30g (that's half a loaf of bread you need to eat to reach that). For white bread it's 0.3g, wholemeal 1.9g. And yes, whilst wholemeal is better for you, that's still not an amazing amount for the impact it has on your blood sugar. 

Should I give up bread? 

Our office is split in half – those of us who don't touch bread and those who do. The half that don't eat it, no longer miss it – not even our morning toast. Okay, maybe a slice of sourdough with smashed avocado and eggs topped with hollandaise still tugs out our heart strings, but we have our smoothie bowls to eat for lunch and that's fine by us.

Arm yourself with facts 

Here’s the important thing, whether you decide to quit bread or not is purely a personal choice. For some of us the health benefits far outweigh missing the odd sandwich, for others it has less of an impact on their health. If you suffer from reflux, swollen joints, type 2 diabetes, bloating and other related problems binning the bread should be a no brainier

Article credit : Alasdair Adam

References:

1. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/295235
2. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/public-health-nutrition/article/wholegrain-cereals-and-bread-a-duet-of-the-mediterranean-diet-for-the-prevention-of-chronic-diseases
3. https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-14-1091 

Cutting bread from your diet helps with weight loss and has other health benefits.

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